Mythical Stainless Steel US Perfect Replica A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour Le Mérite – Reprise

There is little more mythical in the world of horology than the existence of a handful of stainless steel watches by 1:1 fake A. Lange & Söhne, a brand that only officially makes its timepieces housed in luxurious precious metals.
In The Value Of Rarity: Christie’s Auctions A Black-Dialed A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 In Stainless Steel, GaryG states that there are perhaps only 25 stainless steel watches of any kind by A. Lange & Söhne in circulation.

A. Lange & Söhne isn’t saying, and there has been lots of speculation, but what is known for sure is that at least some of these rare stainless steel watches have originated in Milan’s premier watch retail store Pisa Orologeria.
Pisa Orologeria was established in the heart of Milan by Divino Pisa, the second oldest of 13 brothers who began working as a watchmaker and engineer in the early 1930s, eventually founding the first Italian school of watchmaking. Divino was followed by brothers Ugo and Osvaldo, who also opened a small workshop in the city. The Pisa brothers united in the 1950s and their shop soon gained international attention.

Upon Ugo’s passing in the 1970s, the business passed to daughters Grazia and Maristella as well as Fabio Bertini, Osvaldo’s nephew. Maristella’s daughter Chiara entered the business in 2006, the family’s third generation.

Pisa Orologeria continues to make a significant impression on the world horology market because of its tradition, history, and of course its nearly legendary involvement in the almost secretive existence of stainless steel watches by high quality copy A. Lange & Söhne.

In 1992 Bertini – by then director of the business – became friendly with Günter Blümlein of A. Lange & Söhne; Pisa became one of the first retailers to wholeheartedly believe in the re-founded German manufacture.

“When A. Lange & Söhne was re-founded in the 1990s, Pisa Orologeria was one of the first retailers to believe in their rebirth,” Bertini confirmed to me recently. “Therefore at the time I had an ongoing working relationship with Günter Blümlein and I initially proposed to make a Lange 1 in stainless steel. His reply was very rational: he explained to me that the different case material wouldn’t have generated any change in terms of price from the gold-encased version. But my motive wasn’t related to price, I was tickled by the idea of having a steel version of a product usually crafted in gold – this was something outside the box, especially considering it contained an important complication inside. And Mr. Blümlein accepted my offer.”

By the mid-1990s Bertini and Blümlein – Walter Lange’s partner in re-founding A. Lange & Söhne and head of LMH (Les Manufactures Horlogères), which was eventually taken over by Richemont – had together created the handful of stainless steel specialties. These watches are so underground that it is still difficult to find information about them.

However, the now-retired Bertini confirmed to me that Pisa purchased about 20 stainless steel A. Lange & Söhne timepieces in total, three with black dials.
Bertini first desired Swiss movement copy A. Lange & Söhne timepieces with special dials for Pisa. “It was not possible to realize a special dial for them,” Bertini revealed. “Therefore all the changes that were made possible for us involved the case material.”

This included the only Tourbillon Pour le Mérite produced in stainless steel (number 149/150) in 1996. “That watch was crafted upon my request,” Bertini continued. “I liked the idea of such a classical watch realized with a different and unconventional material. The steel tourbillon took only three days to sell: I offered it to Mr. S, and he immediately loved the idea.”
This example of the Tourbillon Pour le Mérite was sold to a collector who goes by Mr. S (he preferred to remain anonymous) in 1996. To my knowledge, this collector from Milan still owned this wristwatch, though Bertini has now informed me that Mr. S has sadly passed away. The whereabouts of the individual example of the stainless steel Tourbillon Pour le Mérite are currently unknown.
Peter Chong had the chance to handle and photograph this stainless steel Tourbillon Pour le Mérite, an experience that he describes in his book, A. Lange & Söhne: The “Pour le Mérite” Collection.

Chong writes that as the dials and hands are identical, outwardly there is no discernible way to tell this piece apart from the regular white gold version except for the weight. It is the absence of precious metal hallmarks that would tip anyone off to the fact that this piece is not white gold or platinum if they weren’t aware that steel is lighter than those two metals (see Here’s Why: Stainless Steel Is The Most Precious Metal).

Today, the rare-as-hen’s-teeth stainless steel examples are the most sought-after collector’s pieces made by A. Lange & Söhne.
For the enduring and thorough story of the A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour le Mérite, see Why The A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 copy with brown leather strap Is One Of The Most Historically Important Modern Wristwatches and for more on A. Lange & Söhne’s rare stainless steel models see The Value Of Rarity: Christie’s Auctions A Black-Dialed A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 In Stainless Steel (Exclusive And Never-Seen Photos).

With very special thanks to Peter Chong of Deployant for the kind permission to use his exceptional photos.
Quick Facts A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour le Mérite Reference 701.006 stainless steel
Case: stainless steel, 38.5 x 10 mm
Dial: silvered with black painted Arabic numerals
Movement: manually wound Caliber L902.0; frequency 2.5 Hz/18,000 vph; power reserve 36 hours; one-minute tourbillon; chain and fusée subassembly for constant force
Functions: hours, minutes, subsidiary seconds; power reserve indication
Limitation: one unique piece in this metal; 106 in yellow gold; 50 in platinum; 24 in pink gold; 19 in white gold
Year of manufacture: 1996
Original retail price: 150,000,000 Italian lire (previous official currency of Italy)

Why I Bought It: US Swiss Luxury Replica A. Lange & Söhne Double Split – Reprise

What’s so special about the best quality fake A. Lange & Söhne Double Split – or as I started calling it as soon as I bought it, the “Mighty Double Split?”

In this latest edition of the “Why I Bought It” series, I hope to give you a good impression about why I chose this watch among the many ultra-complicated chronographs out there, why I’m still pleased with my purchase three years later, and what you might want to consider if you think that this stalwart of the Lange line could be the one for you.
Why I bought it

In my friend Terry’s collecting taxonomy (described in more detail in Why I Bought It: Vianney Halter Deep Space Tourbillon), the Double Split definitely falls in the “investment” realm: a piece with fairly predictable market value that is important in its own right and can be a foundational element within a collection.
One of the great things about these sorts of replica watches from a collector’s perspective is that they allow you to spend (note I didn’t say “invest”) more on your collection than you could otherwise afford.

But that’s not why I bought this watch. In fact, although I’d been a fan of high quality copy A. Lange & Söhne watches for some time, already owned a Datograph, and had known about the Double Split for a while, it wasn’t at the top of my wish list until “the lunch.”
Our small group of Northern California collector crazies had gathered for one of our regular lunches, this time with a Lange theme. As usual with our group, any theme teases some pretty interesting watches out of members’ safe deposit boxes, and this time was no exception. Pieces like one of the ten “Pisa” Datographs in existence and a rare Lange 1 in stainless steel were being handed around and tried on. The “Pisa” is an edition of ten pieces in platinum cases with both solid and exhibition case backs, a silver dial, and blued chronograph hands; they were made for the Italian retailer of the same name.

For me, though, the black dial A. Lange & Söhne copy watch that riveted my attention didn’t actually belong to any of the members; it was a Double Split that belonged to the uncle of one of our gang. Turns out that “Unc” was in town for the day, met up with our buddy, and – by total coincidence – happened to be wearing a Double Split. He was kind enough to lend it to his favorite nephew for lunch.

It is on such small coincidences that collections can turn! My photos from that day are dominated by the Double Split, and I was soon on the hunt. Shortly thereafter, I found a suitable example at auction, and after some much-needed loving care back at the A. Lange & Söhne manufacture (which I reviewed in some detail in Why You Can’t Afford To Buy Your Watch If You Can’t Afford To Break It) found myself with a like-new Double Split that has been one of my very favorite pieces ever since.
Why I love it

The reasons why I love this watch fall into two main categories: how it looks and what it does. Let’s start with appearances.

· It is indeed mighty! The massive platinum case is both hefty and sculpted in ways that to me communicate a real seriousness of purpose. One example: on the rear bezel, the brand name and serial number aren’t just engraved; they are etched into the bezel in deep relief, providing a striking frame for the movement.
Speaking of the movement: even if it weren’t a mechanical marvel, it certainly looks the part! The term I’ve heard over and over again from first-time viewers of my watch is that the movement side looks like a “city under glass.” Lange’s practice of building chronograph complications vertically isn’t to everyone’s taste, but I’m a sucker for this sort of deep dimensionality.

· The finishing is both purposeful and beautiful. A term that I sometimes use to refer to Lange’s style of finishing is “vigorous”: those Glashütte stripes on the bridges, for instance, will never be mistaken for the barely-there striping applied by Philippe Dufour. But for me it’s all part of a coherent Saxon style, like the screwed gold chatons that secure some of the jewels. It is especially appropriate for a masculine watch like the Double Split.
My fantasy

To my good friends at Swiss made copy A. Lange und Söhne: how about a Dato Double Split? Yes, I know you’ve already told me that it can’t be done for a variety of reasons, but I have faith in you!
Quick Facts A. Lange & Söhne Double Split
Case: pink gold; 43.2 x 15.3 mm; previously produced in platinum with black dial
Dial: argenté (silvered)
Movement: manually wound Caliber L001.1 with 38-hour power reserve, 3 Hz/21,600 vph frequency
Functions: hours, minutes, hacking seconds; flyback chronograph with double rattrapante and precisely jumping minute counters; “up/down” power-reserve indicator
Price: current retail price (pink gold) $128,400; recent auction prices as of 2014 (platinum) $77,000 to $87,000
Production years: 2004 onward

US Perfect Fake A. Lange & Söhne Little Lange 1 182.030 Watches For Women

Wrist watch is a private and perceptual thing, which represents the wearer’s preference for beauty and interest for life. Swiss A. Lange & Söhne replica is one of the most luxury watch brands, which is not only precise and punctilious, but also with warm heart.

The 18k rose gold fake watches have silvery dials.
18K Rose Gold Fake A. Lange & Söhne Little Lange 1 182.030 Watches

In 2017, the famous watch brand pushed out Little Lange 1. With small size, it is tailor made for female wearers.

The best watches copy A. Lange & Söhne Little Lange 1 182.030 in 36.8 mm feature polished 18k rose gold cases, white alligator leather straps and silvery galvanised guilloché dials.

The 36.8 mm replica watches have moon phases.
36.8 MM Replica A. Lange & Söhne Little Lange 1 182.030 Watches

Off-centred dial and double date window are two typical features of A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1. Moreover, ref.182.030 features moon phase with hundreds of stars. You can see advanced watchmaking techniques from the delicate fake watches.