The New US Luxury Replica Patek Philippe Sky-Moon Tourbillon At ‘Rare Handcrafts’ Geneva

The Sky-Moon Tourbillon is fake Patek Philippe’s second most complicated watch, after the Grandmaster Chime – the latter is probably going to remain unbeaten as Patek’s most complicated watch for the foreseeable future, thanks to the necessarily high parts count associated with chiming complications. This is not to say the Sky-Moon Tourbillon is anything like an also-ran technically.

The quality Patek Philippe copy watch, which first came out in 2001, and therefore celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, has a grand total of 12 complications, including a repeater chiming on cathedral gongs, a display of sidereal time, and a perpetual calendar. The new watch is ref. 6002R-001 and it replaces its predecessor, the black enamel-dial 6002G-010, in Patek’s catalogue.
The new version of the Sky-Moon Tourbillon remains technically the same as the outgoing model. The Swiss movement copy Patek Philippe watch has displays on both the front and back (which means you forego the pleasure of any view of the movement, although you certainly get something back in terms of information). Topside are the perpetual calendar indications, including day, date, and retrograde month displays, along with mean civil time, and a moonphase; there’s also an indication showing where you are in the Leap Year cycle.
The back of the watch shows the astronomical complications (although strictly speaking, you can think of the perpetual calendar as an astronomical complication, as it reconciles the Gregorian calendar with the length of an actual year).
On the back, there’s a display of the night sky as seen from the Northern Hemisphere (I’ve always wondered whether, for the well-heeled client south of the Equator, it’s possible to order a Southern Hemisphere variant – where there’s a will, there’s a way). The portion of the sky visible above the horizon is the part inside the oval, with the points of the compass shown as well, in order to orient you. The orbit and phase of the Moon are also displayed. The two hands show sidereal time, or “star time.”

Sidereal time indications are fairly rare as they are of no practical use unless you happen to be an astronomer, but they pose an interesting challenge to the watchmaker, who has to calculate separate going trains for mean civil time and for sidereal time. A day is usually defined as the amount of time it takes for the Sun to return to a given point in the sky. Depending on the time of year, the length of a true solar day can vary from the time shown on a clock by up to fifteen minutes (this is the so-called Equation Of Time) and by convention, we give the day a mean, or average, length of 24 hours. The mean local solar day is then used as the basis for civil time, which is the time in use at all locations in a given time zone.
Sidereal time, on the other hand, is based on the amount of time it takes for a given star to return to the same point in the sky. You might think it would be the same as a solar day. However, as the Earth rotates, it’s also moving along its orbit at the same time. The Sun is close enough that the Earth actually has to rotate slightly more than one full rotation to bring it back to (say) its zenith. The stars, however, are far enough away that the effect is negligible, and so a sidereal day is slightly shorter than a solar day, by about four minutes.

Rounding out the complications is the minute repeater, which is activated in the traditional way, by a slide in the side of the case.
The previous version of the Sky Moon Tourbillon was in white gold – the new Patek Philippe copy with brown leather strap is in rose gold but it largely duplicates the engraving motifs of the discontinued model. In addition to the engraving, a couple of different enameling techniques are used as well. The dial periphery and moonphase aperture, as well as the moonphase disk, are done in a technique called champlevé, in which metal is hollowed out and then filled with enamel before firing. The inner part of the dial is decorated with cloisonné enamel – this technique involves shaping flat gold wire into various forms and then filling the resulting cells with enamel.
The engraving remains as elaborately baroque in the new Sky Moon Tourbillon as in the outgoing model – even the hands get the engraver’s attention (Patek says it takes about 100 hours to execute the engraving, which I have no reason to doubt). The complex articulation of every surface looks even more pronounced in the new model, probably thanks to the degree to which red gold emphasizes case details and geometry in comparison to white gold.
Although the Sky-Moon Tourbillon 6002R-001 is debuting at the Rare Handcrafts Exhibition (which is being held in Geneva at Patek’s HQ, from June 16th to 26th), this is not a unique piece, but a regular production model. As with all of Patek’s high complications and high craft pieces, this is an application piece, price on request. I cannot emphasize enough, however, the degree to which you would be unrealistic in the extreme to expect change back from a million CHF.
The clone Patek Philippe Sky-Moon Tourbillon, after twenty years, remains one of the most unapologetically go-to-hell watches in the world. In complexity and craft, it is one of a small handful of watches that are remarkable in themselves, but also functional museums of ultra-high-end Genevan horology. Sure it ain’t cheap (to put it mildly) but you get more horological content in one watch than most brands have in their entire catalogue. The aesthetics are not for everyone – living with a watch like this is probably something like living with the Farnese Table in your breakfast nook. But if you have the scratch, the interest, and the inclination, this is about as big as horological big guns get.

Mythical Stainless Steel US Perfect Replica A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour Le Mérite – Reprise

There is little more mythical in the world of horology than the existence of a handful of stainless steel watches by 1:1 fake A. Lange & Söhne, a brand that only officially makes its timepieces housed in luxurious precious metals.
In The Value Of Rarity: Christie’s Auctions A Black-Dialed A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 In Stainless Steel, GaryG states that there are perhaps only 25 stainless steel watches of any kind by A. Lange & Söhne in circulation.

A. Lange & Söhne isn’t saying, and there has been lots of speculation, but what is known for sure is that at least some of these rare stainless steel watches have originated in Milan’s premier watch retail store Pisa Orologeria.
Pisa Orologeria was established in the heart of Milan by Divino Pisa, the second oldest of 13 brothers who began working as a watchmaker and engineer in the early 1930s, eventually founding the first Italian school of watchmaking. Divino was followed by brothers Ugo and Osvaldo, who also opened a small workshop in the city. The Pisa brothers united in the 1950s and their shop soon gained international attention.

Upon Ugo’s passing in the 1970s, the business passed to daughters Grazia and Maristella as well as Fabio Bertini, Osvaldo’s nephew. Maristella’s daughter Chiara entered the business in 2006, the family’s third generation.

Pisa Orologeria continues to make a significant impression on the world horology market because of its tradition, history, and of course its nearly legendary involvement in the almost secretive existence of stainless steel watches by high quality copy A. Lange & Söhne.

In 1992 Bertini – by then director of the business – became friendly with Günter Blümlein of A. Lange & Söhne; Pisa became one of the first retailers to wholeheartedly believe in the re-founded German manufacture.

“When A. Lange & Söhne was re-founded in the 1990s, Pisa Orologeria was one of the first retailers to believe in their rebirth,” Bertini confirmed to me recently. “Therefore at the time I had an ongoing working relationship with Günter Blümlein and I initially proposed to make a Lange 1 in stainless steel. His reply was very rational: he explained to me that the different case material wouldn’t have generated any change in terms of price from the gold-encased version. But my motive wasn’t related to price, I was tickled by the idea of having a steel version of a product usually crafted in gold – this was something outside the box, especially considering it contained an important complication inside. And Mr. Blümlein accepted my offer.”

By the mid-1990s Bertini and Blümlein – Walter Lange’s partner in re-founding A. Lange & Söhne and head of LMH (Les Manufactures Horlogères), which was eventually taken over by Richemont – had together created the handful of stainless steel specialties. These watches are so underground that it is still difficult to find information about them.

However, the now-retired Bertini confirmed to me that Pisa purchased about 20 stainless steel A. Lange & Söhne timepieces in total, three with black dials.
Bertini first desired Swiss movement copy A. Lange & Söhne timepieces with special dials for Pisa. “It was not possible to realize a special dial for them,” Bertini revealed. “Therefore all the changes that were made possible for us involved the case material.”

This included the only Tourbillon Pour le Mérite produced in stainless steel (number 149/150) in 1996. “That watch was crafted upon my request,” Bertini continued. “I liked the idea of such a classical watch realized with a different and unconventional material. The steel tourbillon took only three days to sell: I offered it to Mr. S, and he immediately loved the idea.”
This example of the Tourbillon Pour le Mérite was sold to a collector who goes by Mr. S (he preferred to remain anonymous) in 1996. To my knowledge, this collector from Milan still owned this wristwatch, though Bertini has now informed me that Mr. S has sadly passed away. The whereabouts of the individual example of the stainless steel Tourbillon Pour le Mérite are currently unknown.
Peter Chong had the chance to handle and photograph this stainless steel Tourbillon Pour le Mérite, an experience that he describes in his book, A. Lange & Söhne: The “Pour le Mérite” Collection.

Chong writes that as the dials and hands are identical, outwardly there is no discernible way to tell this piece apart from the regular white gold version except for the weight. It is the absence of precious metal hallmarks that would tip anyone off to the fact that this piece is not white gold or platinum if they weren’t aware that steel is lighter than those two metals (see Here’s Why: Stainless Steel Is The Most Precious Metal).

Today, the rare-as-hen’s-teeth stainless steel examples are the most sought-after collector’s pieces made by A. Lange & Söhne.
For the enduring and thorough story of the A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour le Mérite, see Why The A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 copy with brown leather strap Is One Of The Most Historically Important Modern Wristwatches and for more on A. Lange & Söhne’s rare stainless steel models see The Value Of Rarity: Christie’s Auctions A Black-Dialed A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 In Stainless Steel (Exclusive And Never-Seen Photos).

With very special thanks to Peter Chong of Deployant for the kind permission to use his exceptional photos.
Quick Facts A. Lange & Söhne Tourbillon Pour le Mérite Reference 701.006 stainless steel
Case: stainless steel, 38.5 x 10 mm
Dial: silvered with black painted Arabic numerals
Movement: manually wound Caliber L902.0; frequency 2.5 Hz/18,000 vph; power reserve 36 hours; one-minute tourbillon; chain and fusée subassembly for constant force
Functions: hours, minutes, subsidiary seconds; power reserve indication
Limitation: one unique piece in this metal; 106 in yellow gold; 50 in platinum; 24 in pink gold; 19 in white gold
Year of manufacture: 1996
Original retail price: 150,000,000 Italian lire (previous official currency of Italy)